In the summertime, my home base is Winter Park, Colorado. I’ve been spending summers here for 25 years and I feel I know the trails and hidden gems pretty well. Of course, some of the more well known places are worth a visit, as well. Between the resort town of Winter Park and the top of Berthoud Pass on Highway 40, there are many trail that branch off from the highway that are worth exploring.

Running through Winter Park is the Fraser River Trail. This river was once great for fly fishing as it passed through Winter Park and Fraser, but as the years have passed, the river has seen some changes – mostly from construction and growth, and even over-fishing (and folks not practicing catch-and-release). I can remember fishing this area 20 years ago and pulling in rainbows and browns regularly, but now I’m happy to catch a few decent fish on a morning’s excursion. But the banks along the Fraser River also offer some nice areas for photography, especially the wildflowers. Lupine, paintbrush, and columbine grow along the Fraser River Trail, coloring the landscape with bright blues, purples, pinks, and reds.

Colorado wildflowers line the Fraser River Trail in Winter Park, Colorado, and attract hummingbirds, ladybugs, and other wildlife.

A hummingbird hovers near a Lupine along the Fraser River Trail.

As you work your way south up Highway 40 from Winter Park, up the switchbacks, and onto Berthoud Pass, you’ll pass several small creeks that are mostly fed from spring snow melt. First and Second Creek wind up the mountain towards Vasquez Ridge. Along the wet and often swampy banks of these little creeks grow Colorado wildflowers of all colors and shapes. I like to arrive at first light and work my way up the banks, photographing whatever flowers and scenes I come across. On these slopes, I can find peace and solitude – a nice escape from the stresses of everyday life – and I can lose myself (not to be confused with getting lost!) for a few quiet hours.

At the top of Berthoud Pass, the famous Continental Divide Trail (CDT) crosses the highway. I like hiking west up the well-marked trail, following the 14 switchbacks up and over to Russell Peak (12,391′), especially before sunrise. Rarely do I see folks up here that early, and the experience of watching the sun climb over the distant peaks is stunning. Often, there are small yellow sunflowers (Old Man of the Mountain – not to be confused with me) that line the trail and grassy slopes at this lofty elevation. The views atop the small summit offer expansive views of Vasquez Ridge and the valley below. In the distance, you can even see a curve of Highway 40, giving you some perspective about how high up the climb takes you.

 

The Continental Divide Trail near Winter Park, Colorado, provides amazing views of the surrounding mountains.

On the way up the Continental Divide Trail just off of Highway 40, I paused to look back and saw the crescent moon rising in the east just ahead of sunrise.

As you travel back down Highway 40 towards Empire, there is another stop to make and explore – Butler Gulch. But I’ll save this area for a little later. The wildflowers don’t really show up in that area until at least late July.

Thanks for reading. Please feel free to follow my journeys on my Colorado facebook page.

Happy Travels!

~ Rob

Images from Colorado

With the heat of summer bearing down on the Lone Star State, I’ve escaped to the mountains of Colorado for a while. With my wife holding down the store front back in the Hill Country, I’m off gallivanting around Colorado in the middle of the night – photographing the Milky Way – and trying to grow our business in the Rocky Mountain State.

I haven’t had the luxury of much sleep lately. A few mornings ago, I shot at the top of Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park (the highest paved road in the United States). From this lofty vantage point over 11,000 feet in elevation, the Milky Way is clear and crisp. But to witness the nighttime spectacle, I had to roll out of bed at 1:45am. I normally never use an alarm clock – always able to awaken on my own even for early morning sunrise shots. However, this was a little early for me. I then drove the one-plus hour to RMNP and made my way up the switchbacks, above tree line, set up and enjoyed the light show. Using a star tracker, I took several long exposures of the Milky Way in a few different locations. One location looked across one of the valleys of RMNP where low clouds filled the cracks and crevices. Another, Lake Irene, provided both a trail and a lake to use in different images. I’d photographed Lake Irene many years before at night, but wanted to return in order to produce high quality prints and digital files – some that could go quite large – up to 8 or 9 feet high – and would retain their crispness.

Starry night over Lake Irene in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Located in Rocky Mountain National Park, Lake Irene is a small, high mountain lake sitting at about 10,000 feet in altitude. In early summer – around 3:30am, the Milky Way rises over this area. Here, the beautiful night sky even showed in the reflections of the calm water.

I returned to RMNP a few days later – this time shooting just after sunset when the Milky Way is more in a horizontal position. I also shot this same view of the Milky Way over Lake Dillon Reservoir near Frisco and Breckenridge.

I think now I’ll focus more on sunrise and sunset photographs. The middle-of-the-night stuff is wearing me down!

Feel free to visit my new Colorado gallery. I hope to be adding images to it for quite a while now.

Happy travels, my friends!

~ Rob

Follow my on my Colorado Facebook page, too!

I’m pleased to announce the launch of a new website, this one featuring my Colorado images. After the success of Images from Texas, I felt the time was right to start displaying some of my work from the Centennial State.  I’ve created several galleries on the website and will be adding more in the coming weeks, months, and even years. My plans are to feature some of the more popular mountain towns like Ouray, Silverton, Aspen, Breckenridge, and Winter Park. Complementing these galleries will be a collection of wildflower images from American Basin, Yankee Boy Basin, the San Juan mountains, and many other iconic summer locations. Other galleries will showcase hiking trails, mountain summits, including some 14ers, and even  black and white photography. Eventually, I hope to include a Denver gallery by adding both local flavor and skyline images.

Colorado wildflower such as these are often found above tree line in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Colorado wildflowers (Old Man of the Mountain) enjoy the last light of evening on the rocky slopes in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Please take a minute to peruse these images. I’ll be adding to this work every day for a while.

Happy Travels! ~ Rob

http://www.ImagesfromColorado.com

http://www.facebook.com/ImagesfromColorado

Goodbye, Colorado

August 1, 2015

I have spent the past 6 weeks in Colorado hiking, photographing the amazing landscapes, and enjoying the cooler weather. From the southern portion of the state in the San Juans to the Maroon Bells near Aspen to my base in Winter Park, the roads I’ve taken have been beautiful and exciting. Along with a friend, I was able to climb another 14er this summer (Humbolt Peak – 14,064 feet), my 31st mountain over 14,000 feet, along with hikes to Booth Lake (over 10 miles) and Byers Peak (nearly 13,000 feet). All were great experiences that left us a bit tired but satisfied with our accomplishments, especially the 14.90 mile trek up Humbolt Peak. Here is the view from the summit as it looks across to Crestone Needle and Crestone Peak.

The Colorado landscape stretches out from the summit of Humbolt Peak.

From the 14,064 summit of Humbolt Peak, Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle rise into the amazing Colorado landscape.

The last week or so I was in Colorado, high country wildflowers began to bloom. Oh, if I only had a few more weeks there!

Colorado's state wildflower, the Columbine, fill a rocky slope near Butler Gulch.

Near 11,500 feet, these beautiful Columbine – Colorado’s state wildflower – waited for the morning sun to warm up the rocks and start the day. I, too, was ready for the sunlight. On this morning, the temperature was below 40 degree and rain had fallen the night before, leaving everything wet.

But alas, work calls and I had to return to photograph the Austin skyline for a client.

The highrises of Austin, Texas can be seen from the Boardwalk that parallels Lady Bird Lake.

On a July evening, the Boardwalk along Lady Bird Lake offers great views of the Austin skyline.

When I was rolling out of Winter Park, the temperature was 41 degrees. Even while driving through New Mexico, the temps staying in the 60s. Amazingly, as soon as I crossed into Texline on the Texas/New  Mexico border, the temperature suddenly jumped into the 90s. That’s crazy! And now we’re in the 100s once again. I think it is going to be a long month of August (Coincidentally, August and February are my least favorite months of the year for many reasons… but that is another story). The goal now is to survive August, find a few nice photo opportunities, and make it to the fall when the leaves change and the cooler temperatures prevail!

I’ve put some of my favorite Rocky Mountain photo here: Colorado Images

Stay cool, everyone!

~ Rob

I recently headed to the Maroon Bells Wilderness Area with a lifelong friend this past week. I had hoped to photograph the area and add to my Maroon Bells portfolio. The weather forecast was not great, but I’d seen worse and still ended up with some great sunsets. So we met along I-70 and drove west through Vail, Eagle, and Glenwood Springs. Along the way, since we were ahead of schedule and the skies were great, we decided to take an excursion to Rifle Falls State Park. Neither of us had been to this small park, so we wanted to check it out. About 20 minutes past Glenwood Springs heading west, we turned north at Rifle and then drove another 20 minutes to the park.

From a lookout alongside Rifle Falls, the view is beautiful in this area of Colorado.

Plunging 70 feet into a green, fertile valley, Rifle Falls is a beautiful waterfall just north of Rifle, Colorado. It is a small state park, and the area provides a great place to explore if you have a free hour or two.

While not big, this little park offers a view of three separate waterfalls that plunge 70 feet and converge into a green, lush valley. A trail makes a loop around the falls – up and over and back down. It is short (maybe a mile), easy, and offers visitors to Glenwood Springs a nice excursion if you have a few hours to kill and the weather is good.

Just north of Rifle and Glenwood Springs, Colorado, Rifle Falls plunges 70 feet into a fertile valley.

With a three-forked waterfall flowing over the cliff, the color green stretched as far as you could see at Rifle Falls State Park near Rifle, Colorado. This 70-foot waterfall is the centerpiece of this small park and offers a trail that takes you to the top of the falls for a bird’s-eye view.

Next, we headed to Rifle, stopping to eat at a local establishment before driving back to Glenwood Springs, down to Carbondale, then on 82 heading to the Snowmass/Aspen area. We drove up to Snowmass Village, checked into our room, and then, since the weather was still ok, drove the 35 minutes up to the Maroon Bells. While driving the final 10 miles or so the clouds rolled in. We pulled into the parking lot and decided we didn’t mind a little sprinkle, then began a short walk around the lake loop. (We had planned on hiking to Maroon Pass, a 13 mile round trip, the next morning at sunrise). For now, we just wanted to be outdoors.

The view from where you begin this walk is amazing. The two 14,000 foot peaks of Maroon and North Maroon rise above Maroon Lake and provide one of the most grand views of Colorado – and I think the most photographed of any location. This is an image from last year.

Maroon Peak and North Maroon Peak rise 14,000 feet and tower over beautiful Maroon Lake.

The Maroon Bells on a perfect summer morning – taken in 2014.

However, the peaks were hidden in a thick fog. Every once in a while, we’d see a blurred outline of something in the distance.

Fog and rain shroud the majesty of the Maroon Bells near Aspen, Colorado.

The Maroon Bells on a foggy, gray, rainy evening. Unfortunately, this is the most of the Bells we saw in two days during the summer of 2015.

About 50 yards into our walk, the rains picked up. No matter, it wasn’t bad. We continued on. A minute later, the bottom fell out. We turned and walked back to the car. We are optimists. We sat in the car for another hour and a half, thinking the deluge would pass by. Finally, near dark, we returned to the room, but not before trying to find something to eat. Everything was closed. The evening was a complete wash, literally.

I set my alarm for the next morning at 430am. When I awoke a little before the alarm, I went outside to find the rains just as we had left them – very active. So I checked again at 530am, then 630am. (As a sidenote, my buddy and I had both played college tennis, so we figured at least we could watch a little Wimbledon on the hotel TV, but even those matches were rained out). Since this trek was for hiking and photography, we finally bailed on our plan and decided to head back towards Denver. Along the way, we’d find another hike. We passed Hanging Lake, a beautiful waterfall at the end of a mile-long uphill climb (it was raining when we passed by the exit). The we passed through Vail – still raining. Next, the rains followed us through Frisco and Dillon. I finally dropped off my friend at his car and drove back to our place in Winter Park. The short trip was a bust. And it still rained all night.

Oh well… the weather doesn’t always cooperate.

Next week, we’ll try again!

Rob

Feel free to visit my Colorado galleries for more (and more colorful) photography.

http://www.facebook.com/RobGreebonPhotography

One of these days I’m going to write a blog about my favorite locations to photograph Colorado wildflowers amid sweeping landscapes. (Visit my Colorado Wildflowers Gallery for more images).On that list would be a little known area (except to locals) close to Berthoud Pass called Butler Gulch. In the summer of 2014 the colors were the best I’d seen – and I’d visited the iconic Colorado locations like American Basin near Lake City and Yankee Boy Basin near Ouray. I imagine the landscapes near Crested Butte were excellent this summer, but I hit that location a bit early.

Butler Gulch is located on Highway 40 past the town of Berthoud Falls. The turnoff is at the first switchback just before you start the climb up Berthoud Pass. Turn left before the first switchback. You’ll follow the road past the Big Bend picnic area a few miles before eventually turning onto an easy dirt road (you’ll have to turn right because you’ll encounter a gate – if you go straight that is restricted access – I think it is a mine). After another mile or so the road will split with the right branch heading uphill. Go left and you will reach a parking area in ~100 yards. Park, walk past by the gate on an old jeep road, and start hiking as the road makes a sweeping left curve before starting a gradual ascent. The trail to the best meadows for wildflowers is just over two miles and about 1000 vertical feet . There are parts of this hike that become a grunt but nothing too bad. The most treacherous portions of this hike are a few water crossings that require short traverses over trees laid across the water. Even these parts are not too difficult, but crossing them in the dark can be a bit sketchy (I usually have to do this because I head up there for sunrise.) Last year I did take a misstep and went down to my knee in a very cold stream. That made for a long morning.

Colorado wildflowers are abundant in July and August in Butler Gulch, near Winter Park.

Wildflowers fill the meadow in this panorama image from Butler Gulch near Berthoud Falls, Colorado.

Eventually you’ll come to a large cascade before heading left and making a few semi-switchbacks. This portion of the trail will shoot you out at a clearing that is the upper portion of the gulch. Continue here for a few hundred yards and off to your left you’ll find the flowers. You can continue on to some old mine ruins or even hike up to the ridge. But if you’ve come for Colorado wildflowers, here you’ll find daisies, various colors of paintbrush, elephants, and even columbine on the rocky outcrops to your left. Walk over to the stream 50 yards or so to your right for some images of flowing snow-fed waters lined with pink and red flowers. If you arrive really early – like about 4am – you can even photograph the Milky Way rising over the ridge.

Butler Gulch wildflowers sleep as the Milky Way passes overhead on a summer night in Colorado's Rocky Mountains.

The Milky Way rises over Colorado Wildflowers in a little-known basin called Bulter Gulch.

Butler Gulch is one of my favorite Colorado locations for wildflowers and landscapes. I make the trek up here several times each summer. Many folks use this trail, so go early because parking can be limited. If you get up there before sunrise, you’ll have the place to yourself unless I’m up there!

Thanks~

~ Rob

http://www.facebook.com/RobGreebonPhotography

 

Having to spend 6 weeks in the Rocky Mountains is a tough job, but I suppose someone has to do it. Alas, this is my job – photographing Colorado landscapes and Austin, Texas, skylines, as well as other Texas locations.

In late July, wildflowers begin to burst forth in the basins and gulches of Colorado’s high country. When the timing is right, one of the areas I try to visit is Yankee Boy Basin near Ouray, located in the Uncompahgre National Forest. The dirt road leading to Yankee Boy isn’t too bad for the first 6 miles. Most passenger cars can do it. Along the way you’ll pass by an old mine and the much photographed Twin Falls. After that, however, the road turns considerably worse. I’m willing to take my 4WD SUV another 2 miles, but no further. You can take a high clearance 4WD higher, but I’m happy reaching the 8 mile point. This area provides colorful Colorado wildflowers, including columbine, paintbrush, daisies and bluebells, against a landscape punctuated by one of Colorado’s 14,000 foot peaks, Mount Sneffels. In the evening you can shoot towards Sneffels and, if the conditions are right, you’ll have a great sunset as well.

The most recent evening I was there I arrived about 6:30pm after bumping my way up the last two miles. As soon as I got out of my car, the rains came. After a few minutes, as usually happens at 12,000 feet, the air quickly cleared and gave way to a beautiful evening. I spent the next few hours enjoying the scenery and practicing my craft.

Colorado Wildflowers put on a show in Colorado's Yankee Boy Basin.

The wildflowers of Yankee Boy Basin near Ouray, Colroado, can put on quite a show in July and August.

Yankee Boy Basin is actually private land and made public by the generosity of its owners. The wildflowers tend to peak the third and fourth weeks of July. If your are adventurous and physically fit, you can also hike Mount Sneffels. Alternatively, the hike from Yankee Boy Basin over Blue Lakes Pass and down to the second and first Blue Lakes is also breathtaking. On the other side of the ridge, especially looking down on the turquoise waters of the Lower Blue Lake you’ll find a slope filled with wildflowers in mid summer. I’ve done this hike and, while tired at the end, I thoroughly enjoyed the vistas and landscapes and most of all the colorful flowers of the area.

If I can answer any questions about this area, just let me know.

In the meantime, feel free to visit my Colorado Gallery.

Also, keep up with my photography on my Professional Facebook page.

Happy Travels,

~ Rob