Waiting for the Rain

February 10, 2016

The month of February is not high on my list of favorite months. This usually gray, cold, windy month leaves me longing for the end of March when our Texas wildflowers begin to appear. The weather folks say El Nino is as strong as ever,  but here in the Hill Country, it has been 38 days since we’ve enjoyed any appreciable rainfall. This does not bode well for a colorful spring. Copious amounts of rain fell in November and December. Parts of my land are covered in bluebonnet rosettes right now – as many as I have ever seen. But these baby bonnets need some rain, as do their seedling cousins, the Indian paintbrush, the coreopsis, and the firewheels, among others. The long term forecast from the Climate Prediction Center shows the weather pattern may change in a few weeks, hopefully bringing us into a more favorable jet stream cycle. Keep your fingers crossed! In the meantime, here is a bluebonnet field from 2013 along the shores of Lake Travis. Ironically, this stretch of land is now underwater thanks to the precipitation from this past fall:

Bluebonnets grow along the shores of Lake Travis on the edge of the Texas Hill Country.

Sunrise greets a flowing field of Texas bluebonnets. As the state wildflower, the bluebonnet is a favorite of Texans everywhere.

In the meantime, I’ve spent more time in downtown Austin searching for unique angles of the skyline where few, if any, cranes are visible. That is a difficult task. Still, there are a few locations where you can minimize the distractions. And from certain perspectives, the cranes are easily removed through post-processing in photoshop. In the winter months when the trees are bare, I like to shoot at a few of these locations.

First, Lou Neff Point offers a great view across the water of the downtown cityscape. In late January, the sun rises directly down the eastern flow of Lady Bird Lake. Often on cold mornings, fog drifts off the warmer water creating a mystical feel as the first light permeates the mist. From about 40 minutes before sunrise to a few minutes afterwards, this single location offers a great contrast in lighting conditions, and you don’t have to move at all. Just wear warm clothing because standing still when the temperature is in the low 30s is not a recipe for patience.

Next, I enjoy shooting at a pool near the Long Center. On calm mornings, this shallow structure gives wonderful reflections of Austin’s most well-known high rises, including the Austonian and the Frost Tower. Two flag poles rise in the same image and give you a chance to use them in framing the buildings if so desired. I also like to create a panorama from this area, and that allows me to include most of the skyline and even the Long Center itself.

The Austin skyline rises in to the cold February morning air.

On a cold morning near the Long Center, the Austin skyline shines in the early morning air. In the southeast, the crescent moon leads the sun above the horizon. This pool to the north of the Long Center offers great reflections of this beautiful central Texas captiol city.

Recently, I’ve also been flying my drone a bit more in an attempt to capture some unique views of the downtown area. About 25 minutes before sunrise, with a faint glow of orange on the horizon, I can start shooting downtown Austin aerial photographs. With such low light, many of the shots come back blurry, so I make sure I take plenty. Usually, I can obtain a few crisp RAW files to work with, and often use them in creating wide angle panoramas of the skyline. The image below shows downtown as seen from South Congress Avenue looking north, and this panorama is made of 3 separate images. At the end of South Congress is the Texas State Capitol.

This aerial view of Austin overlooks South Congress heading north to the Capitol.

The Austin skyline awakens to soft pastels of pink and blue in this aerial panorama image looking down Congress Avenue towards downtown and the Texas State Capitol. Taken on a cold February morning, this view shows the high rises that make up the cityscape of this capitol city.

While I await our spring wildflower season, locations such as these keep me coming out for early morning sunrises. But I do admit, I’m ready for spring. We just need a little rain to make the wait worthwhile!

In the meantime, happy travels, everyone!

~ Rob

http://www.ImagesfromTexas.com

http://www.facebook.com/ImagesfromTexas

2015 and Gratitude

January 2, 2016

As I reflect on 2015, I’m filled with thankfulness on what has been a really good year.

My life is busy. Trying to manage a hectic work schedule while keeping a wife and two wonderful little girls happy can be formidable. And I know I’m not alone in this challenge. Lots of folks out there work through the same issues – some going at it alone and with much less support. So for starters, I’m grateful for the patience of my family. As my photography business has grown over the last few years starting with the Rob Greebon Photography website, free time has become a premium. And with the launch of my newest website, Images from Texas, business has more than doubled in the last 9 months. That’s great, but it also creates more demands and responsibilities. I’m also excited about the future. My girls are old enough now where they are starting to want to accompany me on some of my treks. While I’m not sure if they are quite ready for 4am wake-up calls, they did stay out with me one night to photograph the Milky Way while at Pedernales Falls (yes, the following day was a bit tough). More adventures will be in their future, I imagine!

Little Girls under the Milky Way

On a summer night, two precious girls enjoy the view of the night sky in the Texas Hill Country.

Along with this, around the middle of June, whether through circumstance or fate or whatever you want to call it, a new opportunity arose in my life. With support of my family, stepping through this opened door has been a blessing – both with the new people I’ve met as well as the enjoyment of day to day life. While I won’t go into more detail, it was a prayer answered.

I’m also thankful for having the good fortune to live in the Texas Hill Country just outside of Austin, Texas. The state parks are enchanting and the opportunity to photograph the Texas landscapes seem endless. I’m a short drive from the Pedernales River and Pedernales Falls State Park, and it isn’t too much further to Enchanted Rock. The sunrises and sunsets can be stunning. Often when I’m out at sunrise I’ll not see another person the entire time. I do like my quiet time.

Sunset over Enchanted Rock in the Texas HIll Country

Sunset over Enchanted Rock as seen from Turkey Peak

The Texas Hill Country also offers dark skies which are perfect for photographing the night sky. Whether it is the Milky Way or a meteor shower, clear nights can be amazing. Here is a time-lapse image from the Perseid Meteor shower that comes around each August. This final image is a composite of over 3 hours of photographing the meteors.

Perseids fall across the Texas Hill Country Sky.

The Perseids rain over Pedernales Falls on a clear night in August.

 

Another aspect of life I’m grateful for is the beauty that I find in the details of what I photograph. This idea is especially evident each spring when I’m out searching for Texas wildflowers. Sometimes when I find a field of bluebonnets, I am in awe of the beauty that springtime in Texas brings. I know there is suffering in this world, but there is also good. And through my photography I try to bring out the uniqueness, the color, and the amazing scenes that are out there for us to appreciate.

As I get older, I think I’m getting better at enjoying the little things despite a hectic schedule. I try to stop and really notice my daughters – their expressions, their wonder, their precious mannerisms. I am not as stressed about things that just don’t matter in the big scheme of things. I stare at the the stars a little more at night; I study the patterns and petals of a red and gold firewheel just a bit more when it blooms in the spring. The fleeting time I have with my few close friends I appreciate even more for I know the moments will not last.

I have a pretty good life, and it is just getting better. 2016 is going to rock!

Happy Travels, everyone.

~ Rob

And follow my photography on my facebook page if you are so inclined 🙂

Palo Duro Canyon in November

December 12, 2015

I had the opportunity to travel through the Texas Panhandle during the middle of Thanksgiving. I took this opportunity to spend a few days at Palo Duro Canyon State Park just south of Amarillo. I’ve passed by this area so many times to and from Colorado, but my car was always packed and I’d have miles to travel before I slept, so Palo Duro never made it in the plans. This time, however, I stopped. And I’m glad I did.

First, I invite you to visit this gallery and see all my Palo Duro Canyon images. I’ll also be adding the same images to this gallery, but it will be a bit longer as this location is still a work in progress.

The gates at Palo Duro Canyon State Park do not open until 8:00am. This can pose a problem for photographers if you are not staying in the park. As I was with my family, and camping out in 20 degree temperatures was not an option, we stayed in nearby Canyon, Texas. So in order to shoot in the canyon at sunrise, I arranged with a park ranger to enter the park boundaries about an hour before sunrise. This kindness from the Park folks made all the difference on this trip. I was able to photograph sunrise both at the canyon rim and down on the trails, and the colors I enjoyed were magnificent.

Sunrise at Palo Duro Canyon was a magnificent sight to enjoy.

The sun peeks over the distant canyon walls at Palo Duro Canyon State Park on a cold November morning. Below me opened up the 2nd largest canyon in North America, more than 800 feet deep and hundreds of miles long. This area of the Texas Panhandle offers endless outdoor experiences, and sunrise at the canyon rim should not be missed.

One evening, I convinced my patient wife to accompany me on a 6 mile walk (round trip) to one of the icons of the park, the Lighthouse. This trail is the most popular in the park. As we walked the first three miles, we encountered many folks returning, but no one going our way. We arrived about an hour before sunset. We had the beautiful hoodoo all to ourselves. We explored, talked, took in the view, and enjoyed a sunset not soon forgotten. Our walk back as a nearly full moon lit the trail before us was both surreal and enchanting.

The Lighthouse, an iconic and well-known structure in Palo Duro Canyon, enjoys a cold evening in this Texas panorama.

With the moon rising in the east and the sun setting in the west, the Lighthouse at Palo Duro Canyon shows its orange color in the fading light of day. This panorama shows the view from the small plateau near this iconic rock structure in the Texas Panhandle, and below the canyon stretches for miles and miles.

As far as the technical aspects of shooting here, I’d suggest a tripod and a wide angle lens. I primarily used my Canon 11-24L and my 24-105L (just a bit). All images were shot with the Canon 5DSr, and the details are incredible.

On the way back to the Hill Country, I also had the opportunity to shoot both a cotton field and a crazy good sunset over a field of hay bales, and both seemed about as “Texas” as you can get.

A crazy beautiful sunset falls over a Texas field of hay bales.

The sunset was amazing over this Texas field. Hay bales were rolled and ready for the winter, and overhead wispy clouds drifted by as the sun set on the horizon.

If you like rugged Texas landscapes, I hope you get the chance to visit this remote part of our state. It is well worth the effort. Personally, I’d like to return in spring when everything is turning green and the wildflowers are blooming and again in Autumn when the trees are changing.

In the meantime, happy travels, everyone!

~ Rob

http://www.ImagesfromTexas.com

In the late afternoon on a day this past April, I was at home debating about whether I wanted to drive the 1+ hour to Llano, then onto Mason in search of wildflowers. I knew there were some nice fields of springtime blooms between these two towns, but storms had been blowing across the Texas Hill Country all day, and radar showed more moving in. Still, the forecast showed these storms would dissipate around 8pm. Hesitantly, I headed out, drove up Hwy 71, and as I neared Llano, the rain was so intense I had to pull over (the first time I’ve ever pulled over because of rain). I checked the Ipad and the radar showed the storms would/should be passing through in the next hour. Again, I considered returning home, but instead waited for the rain’s intensity to decrease (it did not stop but did lighten up a bit) and I headed on through Llano, then turned towards Mason. About half way to Mason, light began to appear in the west. Behind me, a rainbow rose into the dark sky as lightening still flashed across the angry clouds. I stopped in several places to capture the rainbow, then the clouds lit up. The image below was one of the highlights of that memorable trek. It was still raining as I reeled off several shots of these amazing mammatus clouds over the wildflower field.

Recently, I found out this photograph of Hill Country Wildflowers after the Rain 1 was awarded the grand prize in the Texas Hill Country Alliance’s 2015 photo contest. This was quite an honor, and it is the second time one of my images has won the top prize. In 2013, my “Milky Way over Pedernales Falls” was the winner. I gave up some sleep and stayed out very late that night, as well, to photograph the stars.

Its nice that perseverance, patience, and the willingness to push through less-than-desirable situations are sometimes rewarded. I’m just humbled to be chosen – and quite pleased, as well. I know there are times I have rather just stayed in bed rather than rise at 4am to drive to a location to shoot. And at the same time, I’m always glad I got up and out there for sunrise or sunset, and I don’t need any sort of reward for this. Just witnessing landscapes and creations like this makes it worthwhile. Of course, it is nice to get paid for these efforts, as well, as I try to support my family doing something I love! 🙂

Mammatus clouds roll through the sky after storms raged through the Texas Hill Country.

After a strong storm had blown across the Texas Hill Country, evening fell and brought with it some crazy clouds hanging over a Texas wildflower field. This image won the grand prize in the Texas Hill Country Alliance’s annual photo contest in 2015.

So I’ll keep on traveling – looking for those unique views of Texas and all that the Lone Star State offers, and I’ll share them when I can.

Visit my Texas Wildflower Gallery to look at more images.

See ya’ll out on the road!

~ Rob

http://www.facebook.com/RobGreebonPhotography

Goodbye, Colorado

August 1, 2015

I have spent the past 6 weeks in Colorado hiking, photographing the amazing landscapes, and enjoying the cooler weather. From the southern portion of the state in the San Juans to the Maroon Bells near Aspen to my base in Winter Park, the roads I’ve taken have been beautiful and exciting. Along with a friend, I was able to climb another 14er this summer (Humbolt Peak – 14,064 feet), my 31st mountain over 14,000 feet, along with hikes to Booth Lake (over 10 miles) and Byers Peak (nearly 13,000 feet). All were great experiences that left us a bit tired but satisfied with our accomplishments, especially the 14.90 mile trek up Humbolt Peak. Here is the view from the summit as it looks across to Crestone Needle and Crestone Peak.

The Colorado landscape stretches out from the summit of Humbolt Peak.

From the 14,064 summit of Humbolt Peak, Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle rise into the amazing Colorado landscape.

The last week or so I was in Colorado, high country wildflowers began to bloom. Oh, if I only had a few more weeks there!

Colorado's state wildflower, the Columbine, fill a rocky slope near Butler Gulch.

Near 11,500 feet, these beautiful Columbine – Colorado’s state wildflower – waited for the morning sun to warm up the rocks and start the day. I, too, was ready for the sunlight. On this morning, the temperature was below 40 degree and rain had fallen the night before, leaving everything wet.

But alas, work calls and I had to return to photograph the Austin skyline for a client.

The highrises of Austin, Texas can be seen from the Boardwalk that parallels Lady Bird Lake.

On a July evening, the Boardwalk along Lady Bird Lake offers great views of the Austin skyline.

When I was rolling out of Winter Park, the temperature was 41 degrees. Even while driving through New Mexico, the temps staying in the 60s. Amazingly, as soon as I crossed into Texline on the Texas/New  Mexico border, the temperature suddenly jumped into the 90s. That’s crazy! And now we’re in the 100s once again. I think it is going to be a long month of August (Coincidentally, August and February are my least favorite months of the year for many reasons… but that is another story). The goal now is to survive August, find a few nice photo opportunities, and make it to the fall when the leaves change and the cooler temperatures prevail!

I’ve put some of my favorite Rocky Mountain photo here: Colorado Images

Stay cool, everyone!

~ Rob

Bluebonnets are here!

April 18, 2015

I’ve driven 500 miles the last week in search of bluebonnets. But between readying a new website, trekking around for wildflowers, and processing these images, I just haven’t had time to update this blog. Nevertheless, this will be my attempt to add a little more information.

I’m currently posting my most recent wildflower images on my new website – mainly under my bluebonnet gallery. I’ll also be posting images on my Texas facebook page. So far, bluebonnets have been the main subject of my latest photographic adventures. I’ve been all across the Hill Country and have found some pretty nice sites. Many of the dirt roads in a makeshift quadrangle area from Fredericksburg to Mason to Llano to Marble Falls have produced some nice roadside displays, with some bluebonnets reaching into the fields. I’ve explored some of my favorite roads as well as some I haven’t been down before. You just never know what you might find. Here is one image from just south of Mason:

Bluebonnets fill the roadsides of this dirt path near Mason, Texas.

A dirt road in the Hill Country can offer Texas Bluebonnets and other beautiful wildflowers.

Another nice surprise was a trip to Big Bend. After good rains over the winter and spring, I was fortunate to be there when the bluebonnets were out and other wonderful wildflowers were in the middle of a desert bloom. While I’ve visited this amazing and remote national park, I’d never seen the colors I enjoyed this trip. In the photograph below, a patch of bluebonnets rests under a rare rainbow – just very good (and lucky) timing!

Bluebonnets, Big Bend National Park, and a perfect spring day are hard to beat.

Good timing found me photographing bluebonnets as a rainbow appeared in Big Bend National Park.

Bluebonnets are out! So if you enjoy driving the Hill Country, now is the time. The blues won’t last long. Next will be the reds and oranges of firewheels and coreopsis, along with a myriad of other wildflowers… just a few weeks away!

Thanks for stopping by. Safe travels to everyone.

~ Rob

 

 

 

 

 

Texas beauty is different from Colorado beauty. Still, in its own way, Texas has some scenic locations. After leaving Colorado and the Rocky Mountains and returning to Texas, I figured I’d better get used to the heat again. So I headed outdoors.

One of my favorites is Enchanted Rock State Park in the Texas Hill Country. Since I’ve been home, I’ve driven the hour-plus to shoot both sunset and sunrise. For sunrise, I arrived in the middle of the night and also attempted to photograph the Perseid meteor shower in mid-August. (I still have not had time to go through those images).

This past week, I drove out to this Texas state park and photographed the landscape at sunset, then captured the milky way a few hours after that.

On top of the huge granite uplift just north of Fredericksburg, there are some old dead trees. To me, these make the perfect foreground for Texas landscape photography.

The sun sets across the Texas landscape in this Hill Country image from Enchanted Rock State Park.

The sun sets across the Texas landscape in this Hill Country image from Enchanted Rock State Park.

For this particular trip, I shot both to the west (for sunset) and south (for the Milky Way). While walking down the outcrop, I even got lost. Yes, I know that sounds strange, and I’ve been here at least 20 times! I always take a GPS as insurance, but on the way up, the GPS didn’t pick up satellites until halfway up the rock. On the way down, after watching the Milky Way move across the sky for a few hours, everything looked different in the dark.

The Milky Way rises over the Enchanted Rock and the Texas Hill Country on a hot summer night.

The Milky Way rises over the Enchanted Rock and the Texas Hill Country on a hot summer night.

I wandered around for 45 minutes before finally finding my car. I figured I’d either end up on 962 or I’d start back up the rock, so I wasn’t too worried. Still, things are creepy in the middle of the night – and I’ve done plenty of hiking both here and in Colorado. I survived. No Bigfoot, UFOs or crazy folks that night in the Texas Hill Country. Just me.

For more images from this area, feel free to visit my Texas Hill Country Gallery.

Thanks for looking 🙂

~ Rob

 

 

It seems we’re at an in-between time for photography. Our bluebonnet rosettes are showing promise after a slightly colder winter than normal. We just need rain now. The grasses around the Texas Hill Country are still relatively brown, but there are pockets of green showing. Yesterday in Austin, I even saw bluebonnets that had bloomed.
So until everything else things turn green, I’ve been spending time looking back at some old images, as well as heading out to the closest Texas state park to my house, Pedernales Falls State Park.
I ventured out to this park the last two weekends for sunrise, both of which offered pretty amazing colors. From the first day of March, this sunrise greeted me:

Sunrise at Pedernales Falls State Park, nestled in the Texas Hill Country, is a nice place to start the day.

The first day of March greeted the Texas Hill Country with a beautiful sunrise seen here at Pederneles Falls State Park.

For more Texas Hill Country images, please visit my Hill Country Pictures webpages here or here.

I’ve also spent some time revisiting some of my Colorado Wildflower images. I love the Rocky Mountains in the summer, and two things I enjoy doing are 1)climbing and 2)photographing the wildflowers on these hikes. This wildflower image comes from a trek up Mount Massive, one of Colorado’s tallest 14ers.

Colorado wildflower images are some of my favorite pictures take while in the Rocky Mountains.

From around 12,000 feet, these Colorado Wildflowers adorn the slopes of Mount Massive.

For more Colorado wildflowers, see my Colorado Images website for these beauties.

One last thing I’ve spent time on is reviewing old Texas wildflower images. I’m so ready for spring and wildflowers to reappear here in the Texas Hill Country. I present here one of my favorite bluebonnet images. This picture was taken outside of Llano where I came across an old wooden fence surrounded by a sea of blue.

Bluebonnets surround an old wooden fence in the Texas Hill Country.

In the Texas Hill Country, I came across this old wooden fence surrounded by bluebonnets in the Spring of 2010.

For more Texas wildflower and bluebonnnet images, please visit Texas Wildflowers.

Also, feel free to follow my wildflower and bluebonnet updates on my Photography Facebook page.

See you out there on the road!

~ Rob

I’ve been asked several time what my favorite places are around Austin, Texas, to photograph. After thinking a bit, I thought I’d come up with my Top 10 list. In the meantime, you can follow my current photographic adventures on my Facebook Photography business page. You can also find my images at one of my business sites – either Rob Greebon Photography or Images from Texas.

So, here are my Top Ten locations around the Austin area (and a few that are short drives out of town).

10 – Mount Bonnell
Located just off 2222, Mount Bonnell is the 2nd highest point in Austin and offers great views of the Colorado River and the 360 Bridge in one direction and the Austin skyline in the other. It is a short walk up some steps from the parking lot. From here, you can enjoy great sunrises and sunsets. If you shoot in the morning, the sun will be at your back. Shooting towards the river and the 360 Bridge in the evening will have the sun setting in front of you.

Mount Bonnell is an Austin icon.

The view from Mount Bonnell in Austin, Texas is great for photographing the 360 Bridge to the west and looking at the Austin skyline to the east.

9 – The Long Center
Home to world class performances, the Long Center also offers a balcony with a fabulous view of downtown Austin. At sunrise you’ll have the sky turning colors. In the evening (on a night when there is no show) you can have the Austin skyline lighting up as sunset fades.

Sunrise comes to the Austin skyline as seen from the balcony of the Long Center.

The Austin Skyline seen from the Long Center before sunrise.

The Long Center in Austin, Texas, hosts world class performances.

The Long Center in downtown Austin sits quietly in the early morning.

8 – Lou Neff Point and the Zilker Park and the Hike and Bike Trails
Take your camera and walk the trails at Zilker Park that surround Lady Bird Lake. You’ll find numerous locations to shoot from, including the foot bridges that cross over Barton Creek as it feeds into Lady Bird Lake. Swans and water fowl also provide opportunities to photograph these beautiful creatures as they enjoy lazy afternoons in the clear water.

Austinites enjoy the cool waters of Lady Bird Lake in Austin Texas on a summer afternoon.

Folks enjoy water sports on a summer afternoon in Zilker Park in the shadow of downtown Austin, Texas.

Lou Neff Point is along the Zilker Park Hike and Bike Trails, but it deserves it’s own mention. This point offers a great view of the Austin skyline across the waters of Lady Bird Lake. I love mornings here when the sun rises in front of you and lights up the sky. In the early morning calm, you can often capture a great reflection of the skyline in the water.

The Austin skyline comes to life on a cold December morning.

Daybreak appears over the Austin skyline and Ladybird Lake on a cool December morning as seen from Lou Neff Point.

7 – Zilker Park Clubhouse
The Zilker Park Clubhouse is on the opposite side of MoPac. It is often locked up with a gate, but there are trails leading to the balcony that afford you fantastic views of downtown Austin. Just down the road (before you reach the clubhouse) is a small parking area that leads to another great view of the Austin skyline. If you shoot here at sunrise, you’ll have the sun rising in front of you. In the evenings, you’ll have a backlit skyline with glass reflecting the oranges and reds of the setting sun.

Taken from the Zilker Park clubhouse, the Austin skyline comes to life at sunrise.

The Austin skyline comes to life as the first light of day appears.

6 – Congress Bridge, Lamar Bridge, and Lady Bird Lake
Also located along the Zilker Park Hike and Bike Trails, these two bridges offer opportunities to capture unique views of Austin, including kayakers and scullers, views of the state capitol (from Congress), and the interesting architecture of the bridges themselves.

A swan swims by underneath Lamar Bridge in Austin, Texas.

Lamar and Congress Bridges offer interesting architecture and unique photo opportunities.

5 – Hamilton Pool
Located about 30 minutes outside of Austin out Hamilton Pool Road, Hamilton Pool offers a chance to photograph an amazing grotto and emerald pool. You can also take a dip when the water is clean. Hamilton Pool does charge an admission, and the change in lighting offers a challenge in finding the optimal exposures. This is a location where HDR can really help you obtain a balance of lights and darks. One downfall of Hamilton Pool is that their hours are very limiting – keeping you out during the magic hours of sunrise and sunset. On the winter solstice, you have the best chance at changing colors in the sky. I was there for just this moment and stayed until the kind park ranger escoreted me out 🙂

Hamilton Pool outside of Austin, Texas, is a favorite of the locals in summertime.

Hamilton Pool is a great place to spend an afternoon and enjoy the views.

4 – The University of Texas at Austin
Famous for the UT Tower, the University of Texas also offers interesting architecture and pools to photograph. Still, the tower is an icon and one of the most photographed locations in Texas. Pick an evening when UT has the tower lit orange and your image will be further enhanced.

The UT tower is lit orange after a huge football victory

The University of Texas Tower is lit orange after the football team defeats Texas A&M.

3 – Pedernales Falls State Park
Pedernales Falls State Park is located about 45 minutes outside of Austin and is well worth the drive through rolling hills. In the spring, wildflowers bloom along the clear waters of the Pedernales River. In autumn, the cypress trees turn a brilliant orange. In summer, cool off in the cold water and enjoy an afternoon. Sunrises and sunsets offer great chances to catch the soft light. The way the river twists and turns, you can always find an angle that gives you a colorful magic hour.

Along the Pedernales River, cypress turn a vibrant orange in autumn.

Fall colors at Pedernales Falls State Park offer amazing photo opportunities.

2 – Pennybacker Bridge (also known as the 360 Bridge)
Outside of Austin at the intersection of 2222 and the 360/Capitol of Texas Highway, Percy Pennybacker designed a steel bridge that would span the rivers of the Colorado River and never touch the waters. The result, Pennybacker Bridge, is an Austin icon. On the northwest and northeast cliffs, you have wonderful views of the bridge and the hill country (from the north east cliff) or the bridge and the Austin skyline (from the northwest cliff). Recently after a few accidents by people falling off the cliffs, signs were posted in the parking lot that indicate you can’t park there. Locals seem to ignore these signs. If you are rules follower, you can still park in the nearby neighborhood around the bridge and walk. Pennybacker Bridge is a great place to enjoy a sunrise or sunset – and it doesn’t matter if you bring a camera!

The sun sets in the west and lights up the skies over Pennybacker Bridge and Austin, Texas.

Sunset comes to Austin, Texas, and the 360 Bridge on an August evening.

A perfect sunset over Pennybacker Bridge and Austin, Texas.

The moon rises in the sky on a perfect evening at the 360 Bridge in Austin, Texas

1 – The Texas State Capitol
The Texas State Capitol sits on 22 acres of lush grass, walkways, and monuments. The front and back of the capitol offer great views, especially in the early morning when you rarely find anyone around. With a soft light, you can use a wide angle to capture the grand scene of the nations’ 2nd largest capitol (second only to the capitol in Washington DC), or you can use a zoom to photograph the top of the limestone structure with the Texas and US flags. Nearly any sidewalk offers a great view. You can even walk down Congress in either direction and capture the scene with streetlights leading to the capitol grounds.

In Austin, Texas, the state capitol is a great place to photograph at sunrise.

The Texas State Capitol is calm in the early morning hours just before sunrise.

There are so many more opportunities around Austin than I can mention here. SoCo (South Congress), the Graffiti Castle, South Lamar, the bats in the late summer, and many other options are there.

These locations are some of my favorite views of Austin, and I hope to keep finding more and more places to visit. I’d love to hear your favorites. Drop me a line or make a suggestion. Thanks for Reading!
~ Rob

I’m not a big fan of being awake at 4:00am. I like my sleep. But sometimes in order to capture an image I think has potential, I have to give up sleep for a bit. A few weeks ago a full moon rose over Austin, Texas in the middle of the night. Early on a Thursday morning, I pulled myself out of bed and left my sleeping family to make the drive over to the 360 Bridge (also known as Pennybacker Bridge). The air was cold and crisp. I shot from two locations – one on the northeast cliff looking over Pennybacker back to the west and the Texas Hill Country. I also trekked down the trail on the northeast side of the 360 Bridge and shot looking back at the Bridge and the Austin skyline in the distance. I knew a full moon would be overhead, but I was blessed with great clouds, as well. I actually blended two exposures together to capture these images. The first was a 5+ minute exposure at 100 ISO (to reduce the noise). The second exposure had a much higher ISO and was less than 30 seconds in order to keep from having star trails creep into the image (I wanted dots of light rather than the star trails). The blend was easy since everything was the same shade of dark blue under the night sky.
This is one image from that night:

Clouds float by over the 360 Bridge and Austin Texas under a full moon.

A full moon lights up the clouds and Pennybacker Bridge on a cool January night in Austin, Texas.

For a few more from that night and a few days later, please visit my Austin gallery or this 360 Bridge Gallery.

Stay tuned for upcoming Texas Wildflower images or follow my latest on facebook here.