With the heat of summer bearing down on the Lone Star State, I’ve escaped to the mountains of Colorado for a while. With my wife holding down the store front back in the Hill Country, I’m off gallivanting around Colorado in the middle of the night – photographing the Milky Way – and trying to grow our business in the Rocky Mountain State.

I haven’t had the luxury of much sleep lately. A few mornings ago, I shot at the top of Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park (the highest paved road in the United States). From this lofty vantage point over 11,000 feet in elevation, the Milky Way is clear and crisp. But to witness the nighttime spectacle, I had to roll out of bed at 1:45am. I normally never use an alarm clock – always able to awaken on my own even for early morning sunrise shots. However, this was a little early for me. I then drove the one-plus hour to RMNP and made my way up the switchbacks, above tree line, set up and enjoyed the light show. Using a star tracker, I took several long exposures of the Milky Way in a few different locations. One location looked across one of the valleys of RMNP where low clouds filled the cracks and crevices. Another, Lake Irene, provided both a trail and a lake to use in different images. I’d photographed Lake Irene many years before at night, but wanted to return in order to produce high quality prints and digital files – some that could go quite large – up to 8 or 9 feet high – and would retain their crispness.

Starry night over Lake Irene in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Located in Rocky Mountain National Park, Lake Irene is a small, high mountain lake sitting at about 10,000 feet in altitude. In early summer – around 3:30am, the Milky Way rises over this area. Here, the beautiful night sky even showed in the reflections of the calm water.

I returned to RMNP a few days later – this time shooting just after sunset when the Milky Way is more in a horizontal position. I also shot this same view of the Milky Way over Lake Dillon Reservoir near Frisco and Breckenridge.

I think now I’ll focus more on sunrise and sunset photographs. The middle-of-the-night stuff is wearing me down!

Feel free to visit my new Colorado gallery. I hope to be adding images to it for quite a while now.

Happy travels, my friends!

~ Rob

Follow my on my Colorado Facebook page, too!

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I’m pleased to announce the launch of a new website, this one featuring my Colorado images. After the success of Images from Texas, I felt the time was right to start displaying some of my work from the Centennial State.  I’ve created several galleries on the website and will be adding more in the coming weeks, months, and even years. My plans are to feature some of the more popular mountain towns like Ouray, Silverton, Aspen, Breckenridge, and Winter Park. Complementing these galleries will be a collection of wildflower images from American Basin, Yankee Boy Basin, the San Juan mountains, and many other iconic summer locations. Other galleries will showcase hiking trails, mountain summits, including some 14ers, and even  black and white photography. Eventually, I hope to include a Denver gallery by adding both local flavor and skyline images.

Colorado wildflower such as these are often found above tree line in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Colorado wildflowers (Old Man of the Mountain) enjoy the last light of evening on the rocky slopes in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Please take a minute to peruse these images. I’ll be adding to this work every day for a while.

Happy Travels! ~ Rob

http://www.ImagesfromColorado.com

http://www.facebook.com/ImagesfromColorado

I recently headed to the Maroon Bells Wilderness Area with a lifelong friend this past week. I had hoped to photograph the area and add to my Maroon Bells portfolio. The weather forecast was not great, but I’d seen worse and still ended up with some great sunsets. So we met along I-70 and drove west through Vail, Eagle, and Glenwood Springs. Along the way, since we were ahead of schedule and the skies were great, we decided to take an excursion to Rifle Falls State Park. Neither of us had been to this small park, so we wanted to check it out. About 20 minutes past Glenwood Springs heading west, we turned north at Rifle and then drove another 20 minutes to the park.

From a lookout alongside Rifle Falls, the view is beautiful in this area of Colorado.

Plunging 70 feet into a green, fertile valley, Rifle Falls is a beautiful waterfall just north of Rifle, Colorado. It is a small state park, and the area provides a great place to explore if you have a free hour or two.

While not big, this little park offers a view of three separate waterfalls that plunge 70 feet and converge into a green, lush valley. A trail makes a loop around the falls – up and over and back down. It is short (maybe a mile), easy, and offers visitors to Glenwood Springs a nice excursion if you have a few hours to kill and the weather is good.

Just north of Rifle and Glenwood Springs, Colorado, Rifle Falls plunges 70 feet into a fertile valley.

With a three-forked waterfall flowing over the cliff, the color green stretched as far as you could see at Rifle Falls State Park near Rifle, Colorado. This 70-foot waterfall is the centerpiece of this small park and offers a trail that takes you to the top of the falls for a bird’s-eye view.

Next, we headed to Rifle, stopping to eat at a local establishment before driving back to Glenwood Springs, down to Carbondale, then on 82 heading to the Snowmass/Aspen area. We drove up to Snowmass Village, checked into our room, and then, since the weather was still ok, drove the 35 minutes up to the Maroon Bells. While driving the final 10 miles or so the clouds rolled in. We pulled into the parking lot and decided we didn’t mind a little sprinkle, then began a short walk around the lake loop. (We had planned on hiking to Maroon Pass, a 13 mile round trip, the next morning at sunrise). For now, we just wanted to be outdoors.

The view from where you begin this walk is amazing. The two 14,000 foot peaks of Maroon and North Maroon rise above Maroon Lake and provide one of the most grand views of Colorado – and I think the most photographed of any location. This is an image from last year.

Maroon Peak and North Maroon Peak rise 14,000 feet and tower over beautiful Maroon Lake.

The Maroon Bells on a perfect summer morning – taken in 2014.

However, the peaks were hidden in a thick fog. Every once in a while, we’d see a blurred outline of something in the distance.

Fog and rain shroud the majesty of the Maroon Bells near Aspen, Colorado.

The Maroon Bells on a foggy, gray, rainy evening. Unfortunately, this is the most of the Bells we saw in two days during the summer of 2015.

About 50 yards into our walk, the rains picked up. No matter, it wasn’t bad. We continued on. A minute later, the bottom fell out. We turned and walked back to the car. We are optimists. We sat in the car for another hour and a half, thinking the deluge would pass by. Finally, near dark, we returned to the room, but not before trying to find something to eat. Everything was closed. The evening was a complete wash, literally.

I set my alarm for the next morning at 430am. When I awoke a little before the alarm, I went outside to find the rains just as we had left them – very active. So I checked again at 530am, then 630am. (As a sidenote, my buddy and I had both played college tennis, so we figured at least we could watch a little Wimbledon on the hotel TV, but even those matches were rained out). Since this trek was for hiking and photography, we finally bailed on our plan and decided to head back towards Denver. Along the way, we’d find another hike. We passed Hanging Lake, a beautiful waterfall at the end of a mile-long uphill climb (it was raining when we passed by the exit). The we passed through Vail – still raining. Next, the rains followed us through Frisco and Dillon. I finally dropped off my friend at his car and drove back to our place in Winter Park. The short trip was a bust. And it still rained all night.

Oh well… the weather doesn’t always cooperate.

Next week, we’ll try again!

Rob

Feel free to visit my Colorado galleries for more (and more colorful) photography.

http://www.facebook.com/RobGreebonPhotography